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Cincinnati Bell Fusion WiFi Product Support

Support, Troubleshooting and FAQs for Fusion WiFi customers. Please select the appropriate section below.



Fusion WiFi: Troubleshooting


How do I locate my Network Name (SSID)?

In the Fusion WiFi setup instructions, your Fusion WiFi phone displays the Network Names (SSIDs) of all the networks it can see closeby (usually no more than 300 feet). If you have followed the directions, but still need some additional information to retrieve this information from your router, try the following.

  • On your computer, search for a file named "WirelessSettings.txt" or WiFiSettings.txt" and look for the SSID (and WEP key) in this file.
  • From a computer or laptop connected (either wireless or wired) to the router, try one of the following links to reach the administrative screens of the router. If you do, you may be able select Configuration > Wireless > Basics from the drop-down menu (or something similar) to find the Network Name (SSID).



  • If you cannot connect to the router as described above, consult the manual for the router or visit the manufacturer's website for further instructions. You can find links to some of the most popular manufacturers here.
  • If you cannot find the Network Name (SSID), you may have to change it. This would also mean changing any devices that are attached to your network, so you may first want to try looking into those other devices to see if they can tell you what SSID they are attached to. If you still want to change it, we provide instructions here.

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How do I locate my Security Password (WEP)?

In the Fusion WiFi setup instructions, you may be asked for a Security Password (WEP key). Actually, the phone also support more advanced security, WPA, as well, for those who are familiar with it. If the phone is asking you to "Enter Key" and you are unsure what to do, try the following.

  • On your computer, search for a file named "WirelessSettings.txt" or WiFiSettings.txt" and look for the WEP key (and SSID) in this file.
  • You can search for the Security Password in the router. If you have a Westell Router from ZoomTown, you may not be able to access this information (it might be blocked for security reasons). Ttry one of the following links to reach the administrative screens of the router from a computer or laptop connected (either wireless or wired) to the router. Select Configuration > Wireless > Security from the drop-down menu.



  • If you see a screen showing Security "Disabled," you do not have security, and the Fusion WiFi phone will not ask you to "Enter Key." If you have security, you will either see your Security Password (shown below), or you will see a series of "*****"s, which means you are not allowed to see the password once it has been entered. This is yet another security feature, which is normally helpful.
  • If you have a ZoomTown router but could not find the Security Password (WEP key), you can run the Installation Disk again. This will re-establish the original Network Name (SSID) and Security Password (WEP key) for that router. If you had selected a different Security Password (WEP key), you will lose the changed password, and have to reprogram your other connected devices per the instructions shown here.
  • If your router is not a Westell from ZoomTown, consult the manual for the router or visit the manufacturers website for further instructions. You can find links to some of the most popular manufacturers here. You will want to follow similar steps as above in order to try to view the Security Password (WEP key).
  • If you cannot find the Security Password (WEP key), you may have to change it. This would also mean changing any devices that are attached to your network. We provide instructions here.

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How do I change my Network Name (SSID) and Security Password (WEP)?

If you have been unable to locate your existing Network Name (SSID) and/or Security Password (WEP key), you may have to change them. This also means changing the settings of devices attached to your Wireless Internet (WiFi) network. To do so, perform the following steps.

  • First, attach a laptop or computer to your modem directly with an Ethernet cord. If you do not do this, you may have to modify the setting on your laptop or computer after each settings change to your modem, which can be difficult.
  • If you have a ZoomTown, you can simply run the Installation Disk again. This will re-establish the original Network Name (SSID) and Security Password (WEP key) for that router. If you had selected a different Security Password (WEP key), you will lose the changed password, and have to reprogram your other connected devices per the instructions shown below.
  • If you are using a router not provided by ZoomTown, consult the manual for the router or visit the manufacturers website for further instructions. You can find links to some of the most popular manufacturers here. You will need to set the Network Name (SSID). We recommend establishing a Security Password (WEP key). Write them down this time. We recommend putting them on your computer in a file named WirelessSettings.txt.
  • On each connected device (computer, laptop, other), find the Wireless Internet (WiFi) Network Settings, sometimes called profiles. This may be found from the Windows "Start" menu, or perhaps from the icons of active programs running.
  • Create a new Profile using the new Network Name (SSID) and Security Password (WEP key) that you just established and Save the profile. When you select this as the active profile (which may happen automatically), your device will attach to the network.





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How do I know if a call is on the WiFi Network or the Cellular Network?

You'll know if you are on a WiFi network or the mobile network at all times by looking at the upper left hand corner of your phone’s display. A green dot indicates WiFi and the name of the network will appear. When on the mobile network, a "T" will indicate connection to a mobile tower.


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How many people can use the same WiFi spot at the same time?

The total number of people that can successfully conduct calls at the same time depends on how the phones are being used. If people are using the mobile Internet to download or upload large files, there will be less bandwidth available. Normally, WiFi hot spots should support at least 5 simultaneous calls. You may experience delay in connectivity while making a call, slower download or upload rates, as well as possible dropped calls while using a WiFi hot spot when multiple people are connected. If you are experiencing call quality problems while accessing a WiFi hot spot, manually turn off the WiFi antenna using your phone’s menu to access the (GSM) mobile network.


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Can I make a 911 call on the WiFi Network?

When making a 911 call while on a WiFi network, your call will be routed automatically to the mobile network to complete the call to the appropriate public safety answering point. Most calls will be able to complete to 911 on the mobile network. If there is no (GSM) mobile coverage available, YOUR CALL WILL NOT COMPLETE TO 911.


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Will my phone work on WiFi networks that are not considered part of the Cincinnati Bell ZoomTown Network?

Yes. Your Fusion WiFi phone can connect to any Internet connection for which you have permission to access. Some will have security (WEP) enabled, while others will be open (unsecured). To make the connection to the new Network Name (SSID) and possibly a security password (WEP key), refer to the Fusion WiFi setup instructions. Please note that connecting to networks other than your home or office network or other authorized WiFi hot spot is not always successful. There are a variety of security codes and authentication requirements that may prevent a phone from connecting. In such cases, you may receive no other indication from the phone other than a failure to connect.


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Should I make my WiFi network secure?

Cincinnati Bell recommends that your home/office WiFi network be secured using WEP security settings. Securing your WiFi connection prevents others from connecting to your WiFi network without permission. Setup is easy via the User Interface provided by the manufacturer of your WiFi router. Your phone and WiFi router must be configured using the same settings to connect and be secure. NOTE: Most public WiFi hot spots are not secured. As such, calls made on those WiFi networks are connected via the public Internet.


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Is my call secure when made on a WiFi network?

Whether your WiFi network is secured with a password or not, your phone calls will have the same protection as they do today on the mobile network.


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How will my phone work while I'm traveling?

Depending on signal availability, your phone will be able to access Cincinnati Bell’s domestic mobile network, as well as any available access point in the United States. If you are outside the Greater Cincinnati/Dayton area traveling domestically, calls will not switch between networks while a call is in progress. Your call will drop. When traveling and connected to a WiFi hot spot, you should complete the call before moving away from the hot spot.


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What happens to the call when I'm on my phone as I enter my home/WiFi network?

If your home WiFi is saved to your Fusion WiFi phone as an available network, then your call should continue without interruption as you move between the mobile network and your WiFi network. The call will be billed as a normal mobile call (not as a Fusion WiFi call) because it was initiated on the (GSM) mobile network.


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What happens to the call when I'm on my Fusion WiFi phone as I leave my House/Office (Wi-Fi Network)?

Your call should continue without interruption as you move from your WiFi network to the mobile network. For ZoomTown customers, the call will be counted as a free Fusion WiFi call. For most non-ZoomTown customers, the call will be billed as a normal mobile call (not as a Fusion WiFi call).


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Why does my battery drain more quickly?

You will experience shorter talk time than most other mobile handsets because the phone’s battery supports three antennas. To improve talk time, manually turn off the WiFi antenna using your phone’s menu when you are not near a WiFi hot spot.


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Will there be roaming or long distance charges when I make a call using a WiFi connection?

Calls initiated domestically on WiFi will not incur any roaming charges. Since your calling plan includes free domestic long distance, the only long distance charges you could see would be for calls made to international locations.


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Why can I connect to a WiFi location with my PC but not my phone?

Some Wireless Internet Networks are free and open to PC users but may require the user to "point and click" to accept "Terms and Conditions." The phone is not able to perform this action—it can't recognize the web screen you would see on your PC and can't perform a "point and click" function, so you won't be able to connect.


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I don't understand some of the terms used when referring to Fusion WiFi. Is there a glossary for these terms?

Please see the chart below for a glossary of terms:

Dayton Zone (D-Zone) Cincinnati Bell's unlimited wireless calling to any number when you're inside a predefined area of Greater Dayton, including unlimited calling to anyone, anywhere across the country as long as you call from inside the Dayton Zone.* And if you happen to be outside of the D-Zone you'll be covered with your anytime minutes. Click here for a map of the Dayton Zone area.
Encryption The conversion of data into a secret code that cannot be easily understood by unauthorized people. Encryption is the most effective way to achieve data security. To read an encrypted file, you must have access to a secret key or password that enables you to decode it.
Encryption Key The password that the handset can use to understand the encryption code. Your phone will tell you when the encryption key is needed.
GSM Stands for "Global System for Mobile Communications", one of the leading digital cellular systems. GSM uses narrowband TDMA, allowing eight simultaneous calls on the same radio frequency. GSM was first introduced in 1991. As of the end of 1997, GSM service was available in more than 100 countries and is the most widely used standard in the world.
Hidden Network An account that has a WiFi network whose name is hidden.
Hot Spot An access point or area for connecting to the Internet.
HTML An acronym for HyperText Markup Language, the authoring language used to create documents on the World Wide Web.
LAN Stands for Local Area Network, a computer network covering a local area, like a home, office, or group of buildings.
Router A router is a device or program that enables a computer to transmit data over telephone or cable lines. Computer information is stored digitally, whereas information transmitted over telephone lines is transmitted in the form of analog waves. A router converts between these two forms.
SSID Short for "Service Set Identifier", a name that identifies a wireless network. When your handset searches for Available Networks, it lists the SSIDs that it sees close by, such as within the same building, or next door. To locate your SSID, you'll need to open the router's administration tool. From the computer connected to the router, first open your Web browser. Then enter the router's address for network administration in the Web address field and hit return to reach the router's home page. Many routers are reached by either the Web address "http://192.168.1.1" or "http://192.168.0.1". Consult your router's documentation to determine the exact address for your model.
SSL Short for "Secure Sockets Layer", a protocol developed by Netscape for transmitting private documents via the Internet. SSL uses a cryptographic system that uses two keys to encrypt data: a public key known to everyone and a private or secret key known only to the recipient of the message.
TDMA Time division multiple access (TDMA) is digital transmission technology that allows a number of users to access a single radio-frequency (RF) channel without interference by allocating unique time slots to each user within each channel.
UMA Short for Unlicensed Mobile Access, UMA describes a telecommunication system that allows seamless roaming and handover between local area networks (LANs) and wide area networks (WANs) using the same dual-mode mobile phone. Fusion WiFi is Cincinnati Bell's brand name for UMA.
Unlimited Everyday Calling A feature offered by Cincinnati Bell that lets you call any Cincinnati Bell number, landlines included, without using any of your plan minutes. Click here for details.
WAN Stands for Wide Area Network, a computer network covering a broad geographical area. The Internet is an example of a Wide Area Network.
WEP Short for "Wired Equivalent Privacy", a security protocol (code) for wireless local area networks. Learn more about WEP.

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